Are Coding Bootcamps Worth It? Stats + Success Stories

Are Coding Bootcamps Worth It? Stats + Success Stories


Right now America has more job openings than at any point since 2001. So that’s good news, we’ve got a lot of job openings. Here’s the catch. Over half a million of those jobs are technology jobs. We’re taking a look at Silicon Valley in jobs the US will face a shortage of over 1
million STEM workers by 2024. There are hundreds of thousands of unfilled tech jobs in the US and around the world and the fact is just that traditional education is just not meeting the demand for those jobs. We have the opportunity to promote programs that we call for example coding boot
camp or online courses that have pioneered new ways to teach tech skills
in a fraction of the time and the costs. A three month computer programming
bootcamp costs $12,000 it won’t get you a software engineering degree, but it
could land you a job in six months. Companies like Google or Microsoft with
an average starting salary of nearly $70,000. What we’re trying to do is create a whole spectrum of alternatives to traditional educational institutions in a way that allows for higher ROI, more flexibility for students. We are familiar with industry trends in a way that you don’t generally see in college programs. We know that the prices can range. There are some $25 a month
subscription ones or you can also do a bootcamp of $14,000. Are graduates
equipped enough with the sorts of skills that employers say they’re looking for? These new models have the potential
to reach underserved communities, to reach women, who are still
underrepresented in this sector, and minorities, who are still
underrepresented in the sector, and veterans, who we know can do the job. And lower-income workers who might have the aptitude for tech jobs but they don’t
know that these jobs are within reach. Before Flatiron School I was studying
mechanical engineering in college. I actually had to drop out. I was working
at Toys ‘R’ Us for a while. I got the chance to experience Ruby I got a chance to experience frameworks like Rails and React. So it was really cool it
was a great experience and I feel like I learned way more that would have learned by myself. After I graduate fromFlatiron I am joining 2U as an apprentice. My name is Bernard Lin. I graduated Hack
Reactor in December 2016. I currently work as a software engineer at Consumer
Reports. I wouldn’t be where I am now without Hack Reactor because I wouldn’t
have been able to develop the skills that got me the job that I have now. And
it was definitely worth it for me. My name is Eva Leake, I am an almost graduate at Flatiron School. I used to be a legal secretary. After I came to Flatiron
School, every week I’ve been really pushed to learn many new technologies.
I feel more empowered. I think that Flatiron School has been one of the
greatest things. I’ve been hired to be a technical coaching fellow and I feel
like I can bring a lot to the role but I wanted to join because I believe in Flatiron and what it does and I wanted give back to the community, so that’s what I did. My name is James, I went to New York Code and Design Academy, I started my own web development
agency and let me show you how I did it. When most people graduate NYCDA they go into software development jobs for major established firms and I went off
and started my own web agency instead. Before NYCDA, I was working part-time
jobs like living paycheck to paycheck and now I’m building this company,
employing about three people and building this portfolio that’s something
I never would have been able to do beforehand. 100 percent NYCDA was worth it. I can’t think of like a more worthy investment of my time and money for an
education. I graduated from General Assembly’s Web
Development Immersive in December 2017 and now I work as a
data visualization developer at the New York City Department of Education.
Understanding what a developer should be paid and then being able to negotiate
that amount and even above because I had a specialty at this point, I
knew exactly how much my worth was. When I negotiated, I got exactly what I was
looking for I actually got more than what I was looking for, which blew my
mind and I’m really happy about it. From what my salary was before, to what
it is now, it’s four times more than what I was getting paid before. Separate from
the salary, because it’s not everything, I’m just really proud that I’m a first
generation female developer in the US. You have to do your research. Read alumni reviews, reach out to alumni on LinkedIn, and ask questions specifically of them.
And then before you sign a check, actually visit the school, right. Go
to an info session, at least talk to somebody on the phone, and ask questions
about their outcomes. You want to know exactly how many people have graduated,
what types of jobs they’re getting, the average starting salary that they’re
getting after they graduate. It turns out it doesn’t matter where you learned code,
it just matters how good you are at writing code. If you can do the job, you
should get the job.

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