De’coding’ stereotypes: March 2018

De’coding’ stereotypes: March 2018


Hey, guys, come on in. Hey Jacob, so can you tell me how do you feel
about this workshop? I’m having a great time. Really? Have you learned a lot? Yes. I also made this ping-pong game on Scratch. Will you show us later on? Sure. Ok, see you then. My name is Bahar Moussavi, I’m a third year
UBC Science student and myself and three other members from the University of British Columbia
founded a non-profit organization called the CODE Initiative with the aim of helping youth
and individuals that are differently-abled find passion in technology, computer programming,
coding and robotics. Our main focus right now are individuals on
the autism spectrum, but we hope to broaden this to include as many different groups of
individuals as possible. There was this one little boy in our workshop
and he was very sensitive to touch. If he was tapped on the shoulder he would
get upset about it. So there was this two week workshop program
and he would be super excited every day. His mom would be like “I can’t believe that
he is actually coming to these willingly and so excited, because he can’t even sit down
for more than 10 minutes and here he is sitting down for like an hour coding in Scratch.” The last day of the workshop he looked at
his volunteer for a good 10 seconds, probably contemplating whether or not he should do
this, and he runs and hugs her and his mom just started of crying because besides his grandparents
and her he’s never hugged anyone. Honestly at that moment all of us were like
this is what we want to do, this is why we are here. We were hoping to teach a lot but then through
the process we learned a lot. We learned that individuals on the autism
spectrum are extremely capable and you just gotta give them the tools and they will shine
brighter than you ever imagined.

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