K–12 Computer Science Framework

K–12 Computer Science Framework


Nicki: For a long time we’ve shown students how
to use different technologies. We haven’t shown them what goes on behind the
scenes the problem solving, the critical thinking, the programming even. Pat: And right now in our nation there is no clear definition of what is computer science,
let alone what K-12 computer science is. The K-12 computer science framework is
set up to answer that question. Tiara: The computer science framework identifies concepts and practices. Todd: You have concept where it’s something that a kid
should know or understand and then you have a practice, what their action is going to be around that. You put them together and they they can help us create some really outstanding experiences for kids with computing. Leigh Ann: Students learn best when the concepts or the knowledge that we hope they acquire is accompanied by hands-on activity, group work, collaboration with their peers and communication with each other. Sarah: So this isn’t just about teaching coding language. This is really about critical thinking skills that all of our kids need. Kathi: Students are walking away from this with more than a set of technical skills but also some perspective or some questions on what computing is like as a discipline and how it might be affecting their lives. Tiara: And we want to make sure
that students of color and that women and students who may have special needs are not left out when we’re talking about computer science. Nicki: We have to be able to train a diverse set of teachers and then we have to open up computer
science topics to make them as relevant to every student regardless of their
race, culture, gender, ethnicity, you name it. Leigh Ann: Education is hard work and the K-12 CS education framework has brought together a group of writers and advisors and
leaders who not only have experience with computing and computer science, but with education. Mark: The important part of a framework is for the community to say, “This is the knowledge that everyone ought to have.” It’s up to the States and the Districts to figure out… How do we structure that? Where does it go into the curriculum? What should teachers actually be doing? Tiara: And so by having that foundation we can then
develop standards which will guide instructional resources and professional
learning experiences and which will eventually impact policies at the state
level. Leigh Ann: Because finally we are codifying for states and for policymakers and curriculum writers the values that make computer science exciting, engaging, and a literacy for the 21st century.

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