Visual programming – Introduction to Scratch, by Margo Tinawi

Visual programming – Introduction to Scratch, by Margo Tinawi


Hi. In this video, we’ll discover
what visual programming is and why you should
give it a try in your classroom. Visual programming is programming with
visual elements rather than solely with text. This is what
textual programming looks like. This code is supposed to add one vote
when I click on this button but it’s not working. Oh yes, I missed one bracket,
that’s why my code failed. Textual programming languages
can be quite painful to learn. Fortunately, visual programming languages
are often much easier. You can drag and drop elements of code
without worrying about the syntax. Here I’m using
RoboWunderkind’s app to program a robot. Of course,
your code still has to make sense. This is Kodu to create 3D animations. As you can see, visual programming languages
are simple, intuitive and fun. They are great tools to introduce kids
and teens to computational thinking. All right! Now let’s have a look at one of
the most used educational visual programming language. That’s Scratch. All you need is
a computer connected to the internet. Go to the Scratch website. You can simply look for Scratch
in your favourite search engine. If English is not your preferred language, you can
change it by scrolling at the bottom of the main page. To create your first project,
press the “Create” button. Don’t worry, this may happen. The online version of Scratch 2.0
runs on a piece of software called Flash. You’ll have to install it and it’s free. The online Scratch editor
has three main sections. This is the stage
where all the animation happens. This is the block palette. The blocks are the little pieces
of code you need for your program. You will drag and drop
those blocks into the scripting area. Now we’re going to do three things. Add a character.
Scratch calls those Sprites. Add a nice backdrop, and
make the character move and say “Hello”. To add a character, the easiest thing to do
is choose one which is already pre-made. If you want to get rid of the cat,
you click right and click left on delete. To add a nice backdrop, same technique. Of course, you could
upload pictures of your own. Great! Let’s make our character move. First we need to specify which action
or event is going to trigger the movement. Let’s use a common event,
when the green flag is clicked. Oops, I drive the wrong block. No problem! I can delete it
by simply dragging it back to the palette. Now let’s tell the character to move.
That’s in the motion section. Let’s choose “move 10 steps” and
snap it with the other block. If we click on the green flag… Tadam! Our character moves forward ten steps. But if we say “move 50 steps”… Uh-oh! My character
is disappearing from the stage. I can drag him back in but
I’m lazy and I don’t want to do that each time, so I’ll add one instruction to my code.
Can you guess which? I’ll use the go to Block. The character will pause
one second and then move forward. Last thing, let’s make
the character say something. Well that’s all for now. Oh but wait! What happens
to my work if I close my browser? Yes, it deletes everything. It’s super important to save your work. To do so, you need to create or
sign in into your Scratch account. Creating a Scratch account takes five minutes. The most difficult part is to find
a username nobody already uses. I already have
an account so I’ll sign in. Let’s call this project… EU Code Week. Now, I can close my browser. If you’d like more ideas or
things to do in Scratch, you’ll find detailed tutorials
by clicking here. And don’t forget to check out
my colleague’s, Jesús’ video on how to make
a Question and Answer game with Scratch. Thanks for listening and happy Scratching! Take advantage of Code Week
to give it a try with your students and add your pin to the map!

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